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Go(a)t Ag Careers?

Go(a)t Ag Careers? 7 June 2018

Go(a)t Ag Careers?

Last week, CTAHR’s Kaua‘i team and the Kaua‘i County Farm Bureau jointly hosted the 23rd Annual Agriculture & Environmental Awareness Day at the Kaua‘i Agricultural Research Center, with multiple exhibits and lectures for the 5th-grade students from local schools who attended.

Lab of Possibilities

Lab of Possibilities 7 June 2018

Lab of Possibilities

The cover story of last week’s Crave section of the Star-Advertiser is all about the ADSC Seed Lab. The seeds it sells come from varieties that have been shown to grow well in Hawai‘i’s unique conditions, and they’re fresh, local, and extremely affordable!

New Faces: Kim Joaquin

New Faces: Kim Joaquin 7 June 2018

New Faces: Kim Joaquin

Kim (Kamalu) Joaquin has started as the new office assistant in the Kamuela Cooperative Extension Office as of Tuesday, May 29. She comes to the college by way of the North Hawaii Community Hospital in Kamuela, and we’re glad she made the switch. Welcome to the CTAHR ‘ohana, Kim!

Wowed by Science

Wowed by Science 7 June 2018

Wowed by Science

Associate Dean Ania Wieczorek and the Saturday Gene-iuses program, and the “Wow Factor” that they promote in kids, are featured in the Good Neighbor column of Midweek Magazine. It’s good timing, because registration is now open for the program, which will start up again in the fall.

Maui Funding No Ka Oi

Maui Funding No Ka Oi 30 May 2018

Maui Funding No Ka Oi

For those applying for the Maui County FY 2019 grant competition, proposals are due directly to Maui County administrator Cindy Reeves at reevesc@hawaii.edu before 4 p.m. on June 14. Projects are expected to be completed within the calendar year, no extensions, and the budget needs to be firm.

What’s in Your Soil and Water?

What’s in Your Soil and Water? 30 May 2018

What’s in Your Soil and Water?

The ADSC) is offering assistance to producers affected by current volcanic eruptions in Puna, Volcano, Pahala, and Oceanview areas. The farmers are allowed to submit free samples of water and soil for testing of pH and heavy metals. O'ahu growers were also invited to send samples to ADSC after the flooding in April.

Sports Diet

Sports Diet 30 May 2018

Sports Diet

Monica Esquivel (HNFAS) recently spoke at the Hawaii Athletic Trainers’ Association High School student workshop on what Registered Dietitians (RD) do, the pathway to becoming an RD, opportunities at UH Manoa, and how diet and food interacts with the body.

Saturday Is for Gene-iuses

Saturday Is for Gene-iuses 30 May 2018

Saturday Is for Gene-iuses

Associate Dean Ania Wieczorek and her Gene-ius Day team recently completed their 6th year coordinating the Saturday Gene-iuses Program, an exciting science education series that offers classes once a month to engage a total of students in innovative hands-on science activities.

All That Poamoho Does

All That Poamoho Does 30 May 2018

All That Poamoho Does

U.S. Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard’s senior legislative assistant, Dave Chun, visited the Poamoho Experiment Station to learn more about the research and Extension demonstration projects taking place there and was impressed by the work being conducted by CTAHR’s dedicated faculty and farm staff!

Pollinator Power

Pollinator Power 16 May 2018

Pollinator Power

The O‘ahu Urban Garden Center will be promoting pollinator-protection awareness and strategies at its Second Saturday at the Garden event on June 9 from 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. The program is coordinated by members of the Bee Hui at the UGC, who provide community education and outreach about bees’ and other pollinators’ essential services.

Music for the Birds

Music for the Birds 16 May 2018

Music for the Birds

Scientist Melissa Price collaborated with artists and the Hawai‘i Symphony Orchestra to create six animated movements that educate youth about Hawai‘i’s endangered native bird species and the importance of conservation.

Screened In

Screened In 10 May 2018

Screened In

A Protected Culture Field Day will be held at the Waimanalo Research Station on Wednesday, May 30, from 10:00 a.m. to noon, where Extension agent Jari Sugano and associate professor Koon Hui Wang (PEPS) will discuss the benefits and disadvantages of screen and high-tunnel systems.

A Flood of Help

A Flood of Help 10 May 2018

A Flood of Help

Emilie Kirk and Russell Messing represented CTAHR and the Kaua‘i Extension team, helping to provide information when hundreds of rural families and farmers showed up seeking answers and assistance at a flood-recovery community meeting on May 3 in Hanalei town.

Growing Giants

Growing Giants 10 May 2018

Growing Giants

Despite the earthquakes and volcanic activity, over 30 interested growers showed up at the Komohana Extension Office or participated online in the first-ever Giant Fruit & Vegetable Seminar, for contestants planning to enter the 2018 Hawaii 4-H Giant Fruit & Vegetable Contest.

Getting Trees in the Ground

Getting Trees in the Ground 10 May 2018

Getting Trees in the Ground

In honor of Arbor Day, Andy Kaufman (TPSS) assisted a class of first- and second-graders to plant a hala tree on the UH campus; then, in honor of ‘Ohi‘a Lehua Day, he assisted a class of third- and fourth-graders to plant ‘ohi‘a trees on the Mid-Pacific campus.

Wet in Waimanalo

Wet in Waimanalo 10 May 2018

Wet in Waimanalo

Cooperative Extension proudly supported O‘ahu RC&D’s Parade of Farms, held at the Waimanalo Research Station on May 5. Faculty and staff from CTAHR helped to coordinate the event, and many CTAHR programs were in attendance to sustain O‘ahu RC&D and the Waimanalo community.

Parade After the Storm

Parade After the Storm 2 May 2018

Parade After the Storm

The O‘ahu Research and Conservation Development Council’s third annual Parade of Farms, hosted at the Waimanalo Research Station, will showcase farms and agriculture-related businesses in Waimanalo this Saturday, but recent storms have necessitated some changes in the tours.

Extension Funding

Extension Funding 2 May 2018

Extension Funding

Andrea Kawabata, associate Extension agent for coffee and orchard crops, was awarded a $750 scholarship from the Roy A. Goff Memorial Endowment Fund to support her participation in the recent Specialty Coffee Association Expo in Seattle. Andrea presented an educational poster illustrating how a specialty coffee region is able to deal with a significant pest (coffee berry borer) in order to continue to provide high-quality coffee to the consumer. Andrea also learned about current research; new technologies, equipment, processing methods; new varieties, and marketing strategies that she will be able to share with Hawai‘i coffee producers. The Roy A. Goff Endowment supports professional development for CTAHR Extension faculty and staff. It’s managed by representatives of Epsilon Sigma Phi Extension fraternity, Hawaii Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences, Hawaii Association of Extension 4-H Agents, and the Hawaii Association of County Agricultural Agents. Applications for the next scholarship will be due July 31—for information about the scholarship, email Julia at zee@hawaii.edu.

Tea-Production Ceremony

Tea-Production Ceremony 2 May 2018

Tea-Production Ceremony

The 24th Tea 101 workshop, conducted by Randall Hamasaki and Stuart Nakamoto, was held at the Mealani Research Station on the Big Island. The seven-hour workshop was jam-packed with information and activity, including tea plant varieties, propagation, planting, shaping, pruning, irrigation, fertilization, pest management, and harvesting, as well as processing and marketing.

Help After the Flooding

Help After the Flooding 2 May 2018

Help After the Flooding

Cooperative Extension's Raymond Uchida, Jari Sugano, Jensen Uyeda, Joshua Silva, Kalani Matsumura, and Ted Radovich supported the O‘ahu City and County Disaster Recovery Centers to assist farmers, residents, and businesses affected by the recent severe weather and flooding, addressing questions on food safety, water quality, disaster-relief assistance, and debris removal.
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1 May 2020

Fast Green Food

Grow a salad bowl in your back yard

Fast Green Food

You may be eating less salad these days. Everyone’s making fewer trips to the supermarket, and lettuce and other tender greens are easily perishable. But growing your own lettuce is a great solution—now and going forward. Lettuce is fast growing and ideal for backyard gardens. You can pick individual leaves each day or harvest whole heads at once. By starting a new set of seeds or transplants every few weeks, you can create succession plantings to ensure a continuous salad bar!

Temperature and Varieties

Lettuce does best in cool climates or during cool seasons. At higher temperatures, lettuce can bolt (flower), become bitter, and form loose heads.

No problem! Just make sure you select the right lettuce. Varieties with tolerance to high temperatures can be grown in warmer areas year-round.

The variety commonly called ‘Mānoa’ lettuce, identified by CTAHR researchers as ideal for Hawai‘i conditions, has always been a local favorite. It has a buttery flavor and crisp texture—my family loves to eat it with a little mayonnaise and shoyu as dressing.

However, in recent years, ‘Mānoa’ lettuce has become extremely sensitive to heat. It may prematurely bolt and develop “tip burn” on the leaf edges. So CTAHR has identified ‘Ānuenue’ as a more heat-tolerant variety. Similar to ‘Mānoa’, it’s another local favorite that can be grown at low elevations. Both can be grown year round in Hawai‘i, and the seeds are available from the UH Seed Laboratory (which offers mail ordering).

There are plenty of other lettuce varieties you can try—just look for types that say they’re heat tolerant. Plant several for a rainbow of colors and tastes!

Nip Problems in the Bud

Besides heat, tip burn can be caused by not enough water, too much fertilizer, or not enough calcium in the soil—but these conditions are easy to fix. First, try watering your lettuce more, then ease up on the fertilizer. As a last resort, add a soil supplement containing calcium.

Thrips, birds, and spotted-wilt virus can also affect your backyard lettuce crop. Consult the UH Cooperative Extension service for the latest pest-control techniques.

Be sure to wash lettuce and other produce thoroughly before serving, to remove any tiny snails or slugs that might be on it.

Feed Your Heads

Lettuce grows best in soils rich in organic matter with a neutral pH. Add organic compost, properly composted chicken manure, and a sprinkle of triple superphosphate fertilizer (0-45-0) to the planting hole for a healthy start. If you can’t find superphosphate, a general-use fertilizer such as 16-16-16 is fine.

After planting, apply a dry general-use fertilizer every three to four weeks or fertilize every two weeks with a water-soluble fertilizer. Because lettuce is eaten raw, use clean, potable water for overhead irrigation and when fertilizing.

Happy salading!

Jari Sugano, O‘ahu County Administrator, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources