News and Events


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Sustainable Swine

Sustainable Swine 4 April 2018

Sustainable Swine

Rajesh Jha (HNFAS) recently offered a training course on “Feed and Nutrition Management” for a group of young ethnic-minority farmers in Nepal, in which he provided knowledge and hands-on skills on utilizing local feedstuffs and food waste as a sustainable source of feed for swine.

Feeding Greatness

Feeding Greatness 28 March 2018

Feeding Greatness

Research by Rajesh Jha and his Animal Sciences students focuses on locally grown feeds for chicken to lower costs, improve environmental sustainability and improve flavor of local fowl.

On Parade

On Parade 21 March 2018

On Parade

The Waimanalo Research Station will be the home base for the 3rd Annual Parade of Farms, presented by the O‘ahu Resource and Conservation Development Council, on Saturday, May 5, from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. This year’s parade will be featuring farms in Waimanalo.

Healthy in Guam

Healthy in Guam 21 March 2018

Healthy in Guam

Former CHL trainee and now Guam EFNEP coordinator Tanisha Franquez Aflague was recently featured in Fresh From the Field, NIFA’s newsletter highlighting success stories of its grantees, about her work with the Children’s Healthy Living (CHL) Project. 

Heritage Roots

Heritage Roots 14 March 2018

Heritage Roots

A Taro Field Day will be held at the Waimanalo Research Station on Saturday, March 17, from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.

More Trees, Please

More Trees, Please 14 March 2018

More Trees, Please

Rich Criley (TPSS) participated in the Trees for Honolulu’s Future workshop on March 9 by showing the series of Extension publications he has written called Expanding Tree Diversity in Hawai‘i’s Landscapes that provide alternatives for landscapers and home growers to the most commonly used trees.

Prune Your Plants

Prune Your Plants 14 March 2018

Prune Your Plants

Cooperative Extension’s Andrea Kawabata (TPSS) and Stuart Nakamoto (HNFAS), along with Tracie Matsumoto from USDA ARS DKI PBARC, hosted two coffee-pruning field days at the Kona Cooperative Extension and Research Station.

New Faces: Roshan Manandhar

New Faces: Roshan Manandhar 14 March 2018

New Faces: Roshan Manandhar

Welcome to Roshan Manandhar, who is joining the Cooperative Extension team in Kaua‘i County as an assistant Extension agent! Roshan has both MS and PhD degrees in entomology from UHM, with post-doctoral experience at Lincoln University in Missouri. 

Tropical Showcase

Tropical Showcase 14 March 2018

Tropical Showcase

The Variety Showcase Goes Tropical event hosted by GoFarm Hawai‘i and the Culinary Breeding Network at Kapi‘olani Community College was an exciting celebration that brought an array of exciting crop varietals together with culture and cuisine, blended brilliantly in bite-size tastings by local chefs.

Up, Up, and Away!

Up, Up, and Away! 7 March 2018

Up, Up, and Away!

Hawai‘i 4-H is highlighted in the National Institute for Food and Agriculture’s Annual Report. The section on youth development notes the STEM-enrichment activities, such as rocketry, that 4-H brings to youth in the Islands. 

New Faces: Casey Bohan

New Faces: Casey Bohan 28 February 2018

New Faces: Casey Bohan

Welcome to Casey Bohan, who has just started at Waiakea Research Station as an agricultural research technician. 

Farming After GoFarm

Farming After GoFarm 28 February 2018

Farming After GoFarm

The beginning-farmer training program GoFarm Hawai‘i held its first Alumni Conference on February 17, where over 100 participants from O‘ahu, Kaua‘i, Maui, and Hawai‘i Island came together to network and learn.

P-20 GENE-IUSES

P-20 GENE-IUSES 21 February 2018

P-20 GENE-IUSES

Staff from the Gene-ius Day program attended the 2018 Hawaii P-20 Middle School Career Industry Fair held on February 15 at the Hawaii Convention Center, introducing students to exciting career pathways in agriculture.

AG WITH A CAPITOL “A”

AG WITH A CAPITOL “A” 21 February 2018

AG WITH A CAPITOL “A”

CTAHR was out in force at the recent Ag Day at the Capitol, which gave legislators a glimpse of the many important impacts agriculture has in the Islands.

Welcome Nolan Johnson

Welcome Nolan Johnson 21 February 2018

Welcome Nolan Johnson

Nolan Johnson, a new agricultural research technician at Mealani Research Station and master’s candidate in Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences with an emphasis on irrigation management, has a background in golf course mangement and civil engineering.

THEY’RE AWARE

THEY’RE AWARE 14 February 2018

THEY’RE AWARE

Over 500 students and teachers attended the Agriculture and Environmental Awareness Day event at the Urban Garden Center to learn about the importance of agriculture and the environment in the community and to find out more about career opportunities in agriculture and environmental studies in Hawai‘i.

AGVENTURE HAS BEEN AN ADVENTURE!

AGVENTURE HAS BEEN AN ADVENTURE! 14 February 2018

AGVENTURE HAS BEEN AN ADVENTURE!

The 4-H AGventure program has just concluded its fifth year. Over a thousand 4th-graders had an opportunity to learn about Hawai‘i’s agriculture from the best of the best. 4-H AGventure owes its success to the support, dedication, and time of the many volunteers who work to make it so great!

Bright Roots

Bright Roots 7 February 2018

Bright Roots

There will be an open house showcasing observations of a colorful carrot variety trial conducted at the Poamoho Research Station on Wednesday, February 28, from 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Malama ‘Ulu

Malama ‘Ulu 7 February 2018

Malama ‘Ulu

Natural Resources and Environmental Management grad student Blaire Langston is holding a workshop on Saturday, February 17, from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon in St. John 106 on how to participate in the ‘Ulu Phenology Project.

A Family (and Community) Man

A Family (and Community) Man 5 February 2018

A Family (and Community) Man

County Administrator Russell Messing was guest speaker at the recent Kaua‘i Association of Family and Community Education Achievement Day luncheon.

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1 May 2020

Fast Green Food

Grow a salad bowl in your back yard

Fast Green Food

You may be eating less salad these days. Everyone’s making fewer trips to the supermarket, and lettuce and other tender greens are easily perishable. But growing your own lettuce is a great solution—now and going forward. Lettuce is fast growing and ideal for backyard gardens. You can pick individual leaves each day or harvest whole heads at once. By starting a new set of seeds or transplants every few weeks, you can create succession plantings to ensure a continuous salad bar!

Temperature and Varieties

Lettuce does best in cool climates or during cool seasons. At higher temperatures, lettuce can bolt (flower), become bitter, and form loose heads.

No problem! Just make sure you select the right lettuce. Varieties with tolerance to high temperatures can be grown in warmer areas year-round.

The variety commonly called ‘Mānoa’ lettuce, identified by CTAHR researchers as ideal for Hawai‘i conditions, has always been a local favorite. It has a buttery flavor and crisp texture—my family loves to eat it with a little mayonnaise and shoyu as dressing.

However, in recent years, ‘Mānoa’ lettuce has become extremely sensitive to heat. It may prematurely bolt and develop “tip burn” on the leaf edges. So CTAHR has identified ‘Ānuenue’ as a more heat-tolerant variety. Similar to ‘Mānoa’, it’s another local favorite that can be grown at low elevations. Both can be grown year round in Hawai‘i, and the seeds are available from the UH Seed Laboratory (which offers mail ordering).

There are plenty of other lettuce varieties you can try—just look for types that say they’re heat tolerant. Plant several for a rainbow of colors and tastes!

Nip Problems in the Bud

Besides heat, tip burn can be caused by not enough water, too much fertilizer, or not enough calcium in the soil—but these conditions are easy to fix. First, try watering your lettuce more, then ease up on the fertilizer. As a last resort, add a soil supplement containing calcium.

Thrips, birds, and spotted-wilt virus can also affect your backyard lettuce crop. Consult the UH Cooperative Extension service for the latest pest-control techniques.

Be sure to wash lettuce and other produce thoroughly before serving, to remove any tiny snails or slugs that might be on it.

Feed Your Heads

Lettuce grows best in soils rich in organic matter with a neutral pH. Add organic compost, properly composted chicken manure, and a sprinkle of triple superphosphate fertilizer (0-45-0) to the planting hole for a healthy start. If you can’t find superphosphate, a general-use fertilizer such as 16-16-16 is fine.

After planting, apply a dry general-use fertilizer every three to four weeks or fertilize every two weeks with a water-soluble fertilizer. Because lettuce is eaten raw, use clean, potable water for overhead irrigation and when fertilizing.

Happy salading!

Jari Sugano, O‘ahu County Administrator, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources