search

 

HAWAIʻI FORESTRY EXTENSION

The rare plant nursery

The rare plant nursery

at the Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge.

'Ohi'a lehua

'Ohi'a lehua

is the first tree to colonize new lava flows and ash deposits. Kīlauea Iki crater, Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.

NREM students

NREM students

measuring a 18-year-old tallowwood
(Eucalyptus microcorys).

Koa Plantation

Koa Plantation

Test plantation of selected superior koa (Acacia koa) trees on Mauna Kea.

Koa Timber

Koa Timber

Koa (Acacia koa) is Hawaii’s most important native timber.

Hawai'i Dry Forest

Hawai'i Dry Forest

Native wili-wili trees in a Hawaiian dry forest. Waikoloa, Hawaiʻi Island, Hawaiʻi.

Coastal Agroforest

Coastal Agroforest

Yap, Federated States of Micronesia.

ʻŌhiʻa lehua

ʻŌhiʻa lehua

Hawaii’s most abundant native tree,
growing above Waimea Canyon, Kauaʻi.

 

CONTACT


Dr. J. B. Friday
CTAHR | University of Hawaiʻi
Cooperative Extension Service
875 Komohana Street
Hilo, HI 96720
Telephone: (808) 969-8254
Fax: (808) 981-5211
Email: jbfriday@hawaii.edu

 

 

WHAT'S NEW at the Forestry Extension Website?

 


Ohia Love Fest Poster

 

 

ʻŌhiʻa Love Fest

A Festival Celebrating ʻŌhiʻa Trees

 

  • Sunday October 21st, 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
  • ʻImiloa Astronomy Center
  • Live music, games, face painting, hula, educational displays, talks, demonstrations

For more information visit rapidohiadeath.org

Link to poster here.

 

 

 

 

 


 

This website and the Hawaiʻi Forestry Extension program partially funded by the
USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) through the Renewable Resources Extension Act.


If you require information in an alternative format, please contact us at: jbfriday@hawaii.edu