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4-H for Hawai‘i

4-H for Hawai‘i 8 June 2017

4-H for Hawai‘i

It's not just livestock

Beyond livestock, 4-H promotes youth well-being, leadership skills, community engagement, and STEM activities, says state coordinator Jeff Goodwin.

The Bee’s Knees

The Bee’s Knees 7 June 2017

The Bee’s Knees

Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences’s Scott Nikaido explains the importance of pollinators to Hawai‘i crops and how people can support pollinator health by using fewer insecticides and more pollinator-friendly plants.

Prepared Youth

Prepared Youth 17 May 2017

Prepared Youth

Hawai‘i is the second state that trained adults to instruct kids in a youth preparedness national pilot project. 3 4-H agents were certified through the Hawai‘i Youth Preparedness Initiative.

A Web Winner

A Web Winner 11 May 2017

A Web Winner

Hawai‘i Association of County Agricultural Agents nominated Andrea Kawabata for their national organization’s Communications Award for her coffee berry borer beetle website.

GoFarm Grows

4 May 2017

GoFarm Grows

The GoFarm Hawai‘i beginning farmer training program received new grants from the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture, Hawai‘i Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, and Kamehameha Schools.

Prevent the Parasite

4 May 2017

Prevent the Parasite

With new cases of rat lungworm reported in the Islands, Extension Agent Jari Sugano was featured on Hawaii News Now offering some tips on reducing the risk of the disease.

Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling 4 May 2017

Gut Feeling

GoFarm and Ag Incubator alumnus and entrepreneur Rob Barreca and graduate student Surely Wallace promoted fermented foods in a recent Honolulu Star-Advertiser article.

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17 October 2019

An Ahupua‘a in Your Backyard

TPSS faculty’s sustainability initiative receives praise

An Ahupua‘a in Your Backyard

A healthy and sustainable project spearheaded by TPSS’s Ted Radovich and Ilima Ho-Lastimosa, as well as Public Health Studies professor Jane Chung-Do, got props from Civil Beat in a recent laudatory article.

The MALAMA (Mini Ahupua‘a for Lifestyle and Mea‘ai through Aquaponics) project helps Native Hawaiian families and communities to create aquaponic systems in their back yards. These can be seen as mini ahupua‘a, since they combine fish and plants in an easy-to-manage and sustainable tank system, re-creating the mauka-to-makai traditions of Hawaiian food and culture. Foods that can be grown through aquaponics include tilapia, onions, Chinese parsley, kalo, and Hawaiian healing herbs, or la‘au lapa‘au.

The co-PIs received a 3-year grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to improve the health of Native Hawaiian communities, since obesity and cardiovascular problems are prominent in this population. The MALAMA Project has set up over 100 aquaponics systems over the last year, offering alternative and healthier food choices.

And the systems are working! Recent research shows families have increased their vegetable and fish intake by one cup per day. Further studies will look at users’ blood pressure, BMI, and other health-related statistics. Besides helping them to get healthier, the systems encourage families to come together and become more in tune with traditional systems, as well as increasing food self-sufficiency.