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4-H for Hawai‘i

4-H for Hawai‘i 8 June 2017

4-H for Hawai‘i

It's not just livestock

Beyond livestock, 4-H promotes youth well-being, leadership skills, community engagement, and STEM activities, says state coordinator Jeff Goodwin.

The Bee’s Knees

The Bee’s Knees 7 June 2017

The Bee’s Knees

Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences’s Scott Nikaido explains the importance of pollinators to Hawai‘i crops and how people can support pollinator health by using fewer insecticides and more pollinator-friendly plants.

Prepared Youth

Prepared Youth 17 May 2017

Prepared Youth

Hawai‘i is the second state that trained adults to instruct kids in a youth preparedness national pilot project. 3 4-H agents were certified through the Hawai‘i Youth Preparedness Initiative.

A Web Winner

A Web Winner 11 May 2017

A Web Winner

Hawai‘i Association of County Agricultural Agents nominated Andrea Kawabata for their national organization’s Communications Award for her coffee berry borer beetle website.

GoFarm Grows

4 May 2017

GoFarm Grows

The GoFarm Hawai‘i beginning farmer training program received new grants from the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture, Hawai‘i Department of Labor and Industrial Relations, and Kamehameha Schools.

Prevent the Parasite

4 May 2017

Prevent the Parasite

With new cases of rat lungworm reported in the Islands, Extension Agent Jari Sugano was featured on Hawaii News Now offering some tips on reducing the risk of the disease.

Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling 4 May 2017

Gut Feeling

GoFarm and Ag Incubator alumnus and entrepreneur Rob Barreca and graduate student Surely Wallace promoted fermented foods in a recent Honolulu Star-Advertiser article.

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17 October 2019

They Love Olives

New agricultural pest discovered at Big Island experiment station

They Love Olives

CTAHR faculty and staff were instrumental in discovering a new fruit fly pest that’s recently been identified in Hawai‘i for the first time: the olive fruit fly (OLFF), Bactrocera oleae. According to the New Pest Advisory from the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture, the OLFF can attack all species of Olea, including the common olive (Olea europaea) and the African olive (Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata), unfitting them for either oil processing or table consumption. 

Damaged olive fruit were found at the Lālāmilo Research Station in Waimea in 2019, in trees that were planted in 2011. Subsequent surveys by HDOA personnel also found the OLFF at other sites on Hawai‘i Island and Maui.

The timing was unfortunate for the pest’s arrival—for the humans, if not the insects—since there was a bumper crop of olives at Lālāmilo in 2019. Average yield per tree by cultivar at Lālāmilo in 2019 ranges from 15.10 lbs per tree for the ‘Mission’ variety’s five trees to a whopping 82.35 lbs. per tree of the seven ‘Koroneiki’ trees! ‘Arbosana’ is nearly as prolific, at 70.39 lbs. per tree. But many of the fruits were spoiled by the pest.

Olives can only be grown in a relatively few areas in the Islands, since they require chilling to induce flowering and do best at high elevations. Lālāmilo is 2,500 ft. above sea level, while the Maui Agricultural Research Center in Kula, where olives are also being grown by CTAHR, is at 3,100 ft.