CTAHR logo links to site

University of Hawaii web site College of Trop Agr & Human Resources web site UH at Manoa web site

Timeline

27 Apr

April 27, 2015

A newly identified disease has killed large numbers of mature ʻōhiʻa trees (Metrosideros polymorpha) in forests and residential areas of the Puna and Hilo Districts of Hawaiʻi Island.
x

A newly identified disease has killed large numbers of mature ʻōhiʻa trees (Metrosideros polymorpha) in forests and residential areas of the Puna and Hilo Districts of Hawaiʻi Island. Landowners have observed that when previously healthy-looking trees begin to exhibit symptoms they typically die within a matter of weeks. Pathogenicity tests conducted by the USDA Agriculture Research Service have determined that the causal agent of the disease is the vascular wilt fungus, Ceratocystis fimbriata (Keith and others 2015). Although a different strain of Ceratocystis fimbriata has been present in Hawaiʻi as a pathogen of sweet potato for decades (Brown and Matsuura, 1941), this is a new strain of the fungus and the first record of any Ceratocystis species affecting ʻōhiʻa. It is not yet known whether this widespread occurrence of ʻōhiʻa mortality results from an introduction of an exotic strain of the fungus or whether this constitutes a new host of an existing strain.  This disease has the potential to kill ʻōhiʻa trees statewide.

22 Jun

June 22, 2015

Ceratocystis fimbriata has been recovered from the frass or sawdust emitted by boring beetles attacking infected trees. In other forests, wind-blown insect frass is a source of new infections. It is currently unknown whether insects transmit ʻōhiʻa wilt or whether they merely attack diseased trees.
x
25 Jun

June 25, 2015

The Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture has agreed to collect samples from landowners who suspect that their trees may have ʻōhiʻa wilt on Oʻahu, Maui, Kauaʻi, Molokaʻi, and Lanaʻi and transport these samples to Hawaiʻi Island for analysis.
x

The Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture has agreed to collect samples from landowners who suspect that their trees may have ʻōhiʻa wilt on Oʻahu, Maui, Kauaʻi, Molokaʻi, and Lanaʻi and transport these samples to Hawaiʻi Island for analysis. Samples may be dropped off at the Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture (HDOA) Plant Quarantine Branch (PQB) on each island. Please see their web page for information on how to take samples and locations of offices. Landowners on Hawaiʻi Island who suspect ʻōhiʻa wilt should contact Drs. Friday, Hughes, or Keith (addresses above).

23 Jul

July 23, 2015

Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death ~ ʻŌhiʻa Wilt: Sampling ʻŌhiʻa trees for infection with Ceratocystis fimbriata See a short video on how to take samples from ʻōhiʻa suspected of having Ceratocystis wilt or Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death. View Here
x

Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death ~ ʻŌhiʻa Wilt: Sampling ʻŌhiʻa trees for infection with Ceratocystis fimbriata

See a short video on how to take samples from ʻōhiʻa suspected of having Ceratocystis wilt or Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death. WARNING: Injuring ʻōhiʻa trees like this may kill them. Be sure the tree you are cutting is already dying. On Hawaiʻi Island, samples may be submitted to Dr. Lisa Keith, USDA, Agriculture Research Service, Daniel K. Inouye Pacific Basin Agriculture Research Center; Lisa.Keith@ars.usda.gov; 808-959-4357. On other islands samples may be submitted to the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture (HDOA) Plant Quarantine Branch (PQB) on each island. (July 2015)

25 Aug

August 25, 2015

Board of Agriculture Restricts Movement of ʻŌhiʻa Plants from Hawaiʻi Island.
x

Board of Agriculture Restricts Movement of ʻŌhiʻa Plants from Hawaiʻi Island: The Hawaiʻi Board of Agriculture today approved an interim rule that imposes a quarantine on the intrastate movement of ʻōhiʻa plants and plant parts, including flowers, leaves, seeds, stems, twigs, cuttings, untreated wood, logs, mulch greenwaste and frass (sawdust from boring beetles) from the Island of Hawaiʻi. Transport of such items may be only conducted with a permit issued by the Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture. The interim rule will also restrict the movement of soil from Hawaiʻi Island beginning in January 2016. The interim rule will go into effect when it is published in the newspapers within 12 days and will be in force for one year.  Read the full press release here.

9 Oct

October 9, 2015

Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death: A House on Fire (video) After Dark at the Park, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death: A House on Fire (video) After Dark at the Park, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park View here
x
27 Oct

October 27, 2015

ʻŌhiʻa samples from Holualoa and Kealakekua on the Kona side of Hawaiʻi Island have been confirmed to be infected with Ceratocystis.
x
24 Dec

December 24, 2015

The Hawaii Department of Lands and Natural Resources has produced a new video about Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death and what people can do to reduce the spread of the disease. View Here
x
27 Jan

January 27, 2016

An aerial survey conducted of 810,000 acres of ʻōhiʻa forests on Hawaii Island has shown that the extent of Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death is much wider than previously thought.
x

An aerial survey conducted by the Hawaii DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife, the USDA Forest Service, the Big Island Invasive Species Committee, and Hawaii Volcanoes National Park staff of 810,000 acres of ʻōhiʻa forests on Hawaii Island has shown that the extent of Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death is much wider than previously thought. Surveyors estimated the current extent of the infestation at 34,000 acres. While the heart of the infestation remains in lower Puna, the surveys revealed a growing area infected by ROD in Kona and possible new infestations in Hamakua and Kohala, areas which had not been affected before. DOFAW staff are following up in sampling to confirm infection in new areas of the island. Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death has not been found on any of the other Hawaiian islands. Read more in the state DLNR news release.

5 Feb

February 5, 2016

UH Lyon Arboretum launches a new effort to save seeds from ʻōhiʻa trees statewide to search for resistant varieties and aid in eventual restoration efforts.
x

Conservationists at the UH Lyon Arboretum have launched a new effort to save seeds from ʻōhiʻa trees statewide to help with scientists search for resistant varieties and aid in eventual restoration efforts. UH faculty J. B. Friday, Sheila Conant, and Kalena Silva explain the threat ROD poses to the Hawaiian forest, native birds, and Hawaiian culture in this video: https://youtu.be/vggJyLFvv5Q.

Marian Chau, director of the Lyon Arboretum seed lab, explains how seed banking can help. The effort is being supported by a crowdfunding campaign at http://friendsoflyon.com/ohialove/.

24 Mar

March 24, 2016

Community leader, Kekuhi Kealiʻikanakaʻoleohaililani, writes a letter to the hula community sharing her aloha and concern for our beloved ʻōhiʻa.
x

Community leader, Kekuhi Kealiʻikanakaʻoleohaililani, writes a letter to the hula community sharing her aloha and concern for our beloved ʻōhiʻa, and suggests ways for the hula community to be actively involved in preventing the spread of C. fimbriata, and helping to heal our ʻōhiʻa ʻohana. For the 2016 Merrie Monarch Festival in Hilo, Hawaiʻi, Kekuhi is working with other Hawaiʻi Island community members to host the Puaʻenaʻena Ceremony. This fire ceremony will provide a way for people to offer their kinolau, hakina, lei, and kūpeʻe with thoughts of full recovery for our ʻŌhiʻa to the fire of Ke Ahi O Hiʻiaka. READ the letter here.

29 Mar

March 29, 2016

The Hawaii Board of Agriculture (HDOA) approved permit conditions for the movement of all soil from Hawaiʻi Island, which were added to the current interisland quarantine to prevent the spread of Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death.
x

HDOA has also created posters and flyers to warn travelers not to transport ʻōhiʻa materials, including lei, from Hawaiʻi Island to any other island.

13 Apr

April 13, 2016

Updated map of sites where Ceratocystis wilt has been confirmed.
x
10 May

May 10, 2016

Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death Briefing document provided to Governor Ige on May 10, 2016.
x

ROD Briefing document

For a summary of the issue, refer to ROD Briefing document dated February 10, 2016.

8 Jun

June 8, 2016

University of Hawaiʻi’s Lyon Arboretum met its $50,000 goal for storing ʻōhiʻa seed.
x

Link to Donate

Link to the University of Hawai'i Foundation to donate.

9 Sep

September 9, 2016

Aerial surveys of six Hawaiian Islands reveal that Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death has impacted nearly 50,000 acres of native forest on the Big Island of Hawai‘i, an increase of some 13,000 acres from surveys done earlier in 2016.
x

Arieal Survey

“It’s important to note that the aerial surveys still need verification by conducting ground-truthing and lab tests,” said Philipp Lahaela Walter, State Resource & Survey Forester for the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife (DOFAW). While some of the increase is due to expanding the survey area, much of it is due to new tree mortality. Read the full text of the press release here.

HD Video of aerial surveys: https://vimeo.com/159851925

Photographs of aerial surveys: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/z9wck7itpwognnb/AADDrl_LCU0PCKKdJf07xEKDa?dl=0

Rapid Ohia Death Video Brochure: https://vimeo.com/149782586

30 Nov

November 30, 2016

Governor David Ige convenes the Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death Summit at the State Capitol on Oahu, where more than 200 people gathered, including legislators, scientists, land managers, students, and concerned citizens
x

Those who attended the Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death Summit heard a series of latest updates about ROD and learned about the proposed ROD Strategic Response Plan, intended as a guide for research and disease management for the next few years. Following presentations, the audience was invited to engage with the panel of presenters during an hour-long question and answer session. Some participants then stayed to take part in afternoon discussions about rapid response, research, funding, and outreach.

7 Dec

December 7, 2016

The Hawaii Department of Agriculture ʻōhiʻa quarantine is now permanent.
x

Governor David Ige signed off on a proposal that restricts movement of ʻōhiʻa off of Hawaii Island to prevent the spread of Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death. The permanent rule replaces the emergency interim rule in place since August of 2015. To learn more, check out the recent press release from the Governor's office.