Friday, December 15, 2017
University of Hawaii at Manoa
University of Hawaii System
College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources
 

Tropical Plant Pathology
Graduate Student Handbook

Degree Requirements

Master’s Program

The MS degree in tropical plant pathology provides a basic education and understanding of the pathogen groupings. The MS degree program is offered under either Plan A (thesis) or Plan B (non-thesis). A total of 30 credit hours are required for each degree option.

M.S. Plan A (Thesis)

This degree option is focused on research and the development of new knowledge. Consequently, 12 credits in PEPS 700 (Thesis Research) is required. These credits are initially taken as PEPS 699 under the direction of your advisor. Upon graduate the 699 credits are converted into 700 credits. submission of acceptable thesis.

Course work required for the MS Plan A are 16 credits in courses approved by the candidate’s committee, including 10 credits in courses numbered 600-698, excluding PEPS 660 and 699. At least 6 credits of the 10 must be selected from PEPS 616, 630, and 646.

Students are also required to take and participate in seminars. PEPS 660 Seminar in Tropical Plant Pathology is required each semester except when you are enrolled in PEPS 799. A minimum of 2 credits in PEPS 660 is required. You are also required to present a proposal and defense seminar PEPS 799 (1 credit hour each for CR/NC). You register for your advisor’s PEPS 799 section. PEPS 799 credits are not counted towards the 30 credit degree requirement.

Plan of Work

You will develop a semester by semester plan of course work in consultation with our advisor. Your plan should ensure that any deficiencies are addressed, that the minium requirements are satisfied, and that you have taken interesting and appropriate course work. Generally, you will present your plan of work during your first committee meeting. At the conclusion of this first meeting Form I is submitted.

Thesis Proposal

The M.S. thesis topic should be a narrowly defined project which demonstrates your potential to bring a research idea from concept to completion. The appropriate scope of an M.S. project is approximately that of a refereed journal publication, but the end result does not have to be published to earn the M.S. degree. As part of the mentoring process and to facilitate progress toward the degree, your faculty advisor will take an active role in defining suitable and acceptable projects. Your advisor is likely to review and edit your proposal, perhaps several times, before presentation to your full committee.

You must write and submit an acceptable thesis proposal to his/her Thesis Committee ideally within the first year after admission. The proposal should follow the format outlined below and will serve as a template for the finished thesis. Approval of the thesis topic is official after the proposal seminar is given and Form II is filed.

Outline for Thesis Proposal

A. Title
B. Introduction (the topic and related research)
C. Objectives and Hypothesis
D. Material and Methods (organized by objective)
E. Literature Cited
F. Research Schedule (Dates for reaching project and degree milestones)

Thesis Seminar and Defense

Upon completion of the proposed research, each student will write a thesis. The thesis will be written in a style agreed upon by the student and committee chair. We usually follow a journal format. Examples of accepted theses are found in our library. The drafting and revision of a thesis can be a long and arduous process taking 2-3 months. After the thesis has reached and acceptable level, it will be publically presented and read the student’s committee. The final seminar will be scheduled and announced. The committee should receive the thesis at least 2 weeks before the seminar to provide time for review.

After the seminar is completed, the floor is opened to questioning from all students and faculty. Upon the conclusion of the open questioning period, the committee will conduct a private examination. This examination will cover the thesis and related areas. When the examination has concluded, the student will be asked to leave the room and the committee will discuss the acceptability of the thesis and the thesis defense. The acceptance of the thesis is determined by a majority vote of the committee. The student will be asked to return to the room and informed of the committee’s decision. The judgement of the thesis is officially recognized with the filing of Form III and with the signing of the signature page. The student may be asked to make edits or additions to the thesis before the signature page is signed or Form III is submitted to the Graduate Division.

M.S. Plan B (Non-Thesis)

This degree option is primarily focused on course work. As such, 19-22 credits in courses approved by the candidate’s committee are required. Sixteen credits in courses numbered 600-698, excluding PEPS 660 and 699, are needed. These courses must include at least 6 credits selected from PEPS 616, 630, and 646.

Directed research experience is also required of the students in this option. Candidates need 6-9 credits in PEPS 699 Directed Research, taken under the direction of 2-3 different faculty members.

Students are also required to take and participate in seminars. PEPS 660 Seminar in Tropical Plant Pathology is required each semester except when you are enrolled in PEPS 799. A minimum of 2 credits in PEPS 660 is required. One credit of PEPS 799 (CR/NC) is to be taken ; 1 credit in PEPS 799 (CR/NC). PEPS 799 credits are not counted towards degree credit requirements.

The Ph.D. Program

Candidates for the Ph.D. program should have earned an M.S. degree in plant pathology or equivalent from a recognized institution. Those with a B.S. or B.A. may petition for admittance into the Ph.D. program only after enrolling in the M.S. program.

The Ph.D. degree has no minimum course requirement. A candidate’s committee develops a course plan together with the student. However Ph.D. students are require to enroll in:

  • PEPS 660 Seminar in Tropical Plant Pathology (1 credit hour) each semester, except when enrolled in PEPS 799

  • PEPS 799 (1 credit hour for the Proposal Seminar and 1 credit hour for the Defense Seminar, or 2 credit hours total). This course is taken as CR/NC and under the committee chair’s registration number.

  • PEPS 800 Dissertation Research (1 credit hour) during semester of graduation

Candidates must also pass comprehensive and final defense examinations. Additionally, a Ph.D. student must submit a dissertation deemed acceptable by their committee.

Dissertation Seminar and Defense

Upon completion of the proposed research, each student will write a dissertation. The dissertation is written in a style agreed upon by the student and committee chair. We usually follow a journal format. Examples of accepted dissertations are found in our library. The drafting and revision of a dissertation can be a long and arduous process taking 2-3 months. After the dissertation has reached and acceptable level, it will be publically presented and read the student’s committee. The defense seminar will be scheduled and announced. The committee should receive the dissertation at least 2 weeks before the seminar to provide time for review.

After the defense seminar is completed, the floor is opened to questioning from all students and faculty. Upon the conclusion of the open questioning period, the committee will conduct a private examination. This examination will cover the dissertation and related areas. When the examination has concluded, the student will be asked to leave the room and the committee will discuss the acceptability of the dissertation and defense. The acceptance of the dissertation is determined by a majority vote of the committee. The student will be asked to return to the room and informed of the committee’s decision. The judgment of the dissertation is officially recognized with the filing of Form III and with the signing of the signature page. The student may be asked to make edits or additions to the dissertation before the signature page is signed or Form III is submitted to the Graduate Division.


Program Goals

  • Students communicate effectively
  • Students are competent and knowledgeable biologists
  • Students conduct research in plant pathology

History

Facilities - PEPS

Facilities - Non Department
Services
Requirements

Seminars

Advisory Committee

Thesis and Dissertation

Timelines

Research Assistant Policies

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