News and Events


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What’s Easy to Grow, Healthy, and Tasty? Beans!

What’s Easy to Grow, Healthy, and Tasty? Beans! 24 April 2020

What’s Easy to Grow, Healthy, and Tasty? Beans!

Legumes are good for you and good for your back yard

If you’re starting a home garden, make sure you add beans! Beans improve soil fertility, which helps crop diversity and sustainability in Hawai‘i. They’re highly nutritious—rich in protein, fiber, and the good carbohydrates. And beans don’t require much water or fertilizer, yet they’re fast-growing and produce heavy yields, especially if you’ve picked the right location.

Beefing Up Production

Beefing Up Production 24 April 2020

Beefing Up Production

HNFAS Extension agent improves pregnancy rates for Wagyu cattle

Wagyu, a Japanese breed of cattle, produces high-quality meat prized by chefs the world over. Unfortunately for steak lovers, Wagyu are also known for having poor reproductive rates. But Kyle Caires is on a mission to change that. He just took the next step forward in his long-term quest to improve the reproductive technologies of cattle with his latest paper.

Microgreens: The Perfect Indoor Crop

Microgreens: The Perfect Indoor Crop 23 April 2020

Microgreens: The Perfect Indoor Crop

Seven simple steps for year-round vegetables

Microgreens are edible vegetables in miniature form. Because of their fast growth, they’re a concentrated source of nutrients, packed with beneficial enzymes. Microgreens are simple to grow on your own and indoors—you can have a year-round source of veggies right on your kitchen counter!

Pau Hana With the Cattlemen

Pau Hana With the Cattlemen 23 April 2020

Pau Hana With the Cattlemen

Extension brings together livestock producers on coronavirus solutions

CTAHR Extension and the Hawaii Cattlemen’s Council are partnering on a series of informal virtual talks with local cattle producers about the impact of COVID-19 on their livestock operations. The goal of the Livestock Producers Pau Hana is to foster communication, increase collaboration, and strengthen the Hawai‘i livestock industry as farmers and ranchers endure and emerge from the economic crisis.

‘Ulu, Coming Through

‘Ulu, Coming Through 21 April 2020

‘Ulu, Coming Through

Extension delivers fruit to Maui Food Bank

CTAHR’s Extension agents are helping those in need on the Valley Isle. After harvesting 60 ‘ulu and seven bunches of bananas from an Extension planting on Maui, Rosemary Gutierrez-Coarite of the Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences donated the entire harvest to the Maui Food Bank, even driving the truckload there herself.

CBB in the Age of COVID-19

CBB in the Age of COVID-19 20 April 2020

CBB in the Age of COVID-19

Online talk-story sessions can help growers

Coffee berry borers don’t practice social distancing! In fact, these invasive pests are massing in the coffee cherries of local growers all over the state. That’s why CTAHR’s coffee berry borer researchers and the Coffee Berry Borer Area-wide Program are hosting virtual talk-story sessions to provide help and information to coffee producers.

Put Your Garden to Bed

Put Your Garden to Bed 17 April 2020

Put Your Garden to Bed

Raised-bed gardening gives you more options

Creating a raised bed over your existing surface is a great gardening solution. In comparison with in-ground planting and pots, raised beds can be the best of both worlds.

Growers’ Needs Assessment

Growers’ Needs Assessment 17 April 2020

Growers’ Needs Assessment

Let Extension know your current situation

The past few weeks have brought significant changes in the agriculture industry in Hawai‘i. With that in mind, CTAHR Extension agents have created a short COVID-19 Agriculture Needs Assessment of the agriculture industry in the state. This information will be used to inform Extension agents throughout the state about the current needs of local producers.

Talk About Growing

Talk About Growing 17 April 2020

Talk About Growing

CTAHR and partners host a virtual talk-story for farmers

Join CTAHR for a virtual talk-story session with local producers, in collaboration with the Hawaii Farm Bureau, Hawai‘i Farmers Union, and Kohala Center. It will be held this Sunday, April 26, from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. Please contact Nicole Milne at nmilne@kohalacenter.org for a link to the online video conference.

Edible Flowers? Yes!

Edible Flowers? Yes! 16 April 2020

Edible Flowers? Yes!

Home-grown herbs and flowers can add freshness, color, and flavor to your table

Growing an herb and edible flower garden at home is rewarding in many ways. It requires little effort and inputs. The sense of accomplishment I get from picking my own fresh herbs from my 2-foot by 5-foot garden bed is well worth the hour per week of attention I put into maintaining the plants. So why not grow your own?

Modes of Communication

Modes of Communication 15 April 2020

Modes of Communication

O‘ahu 4-H takes its Communication Fair online

The O‘ahu 4-H Communication Fair is an annual tradition that dates back more than a decade. So when the coronavirus pandemic cancelled many 4-H events, club meetings, and activities, O‘ahu 4-H adapted to the times and brought it online.

Keeping the Pigs Fed

Keeping the Pigs Fed 15 April 2020

Keeping the Pigs Fed

CTAHR is helping swine producers weather the crisis

Swine specialist Halina Zaleski of CTAHR’s Department of Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences is spearheading the Hog Feed Relief Program to help hog farmers whose livelihoods are being disrupted by the COVID-19 crisis.

Keep Your Ginger Healthy

Keep Your Ginger Healthy 14 April 2020

Keep Your Ginger Healthy

Learn how in an April 23 webinar

Want to learn how to keep your ginger free of bacterial wilt? A new CTAHR webinar will describe how to multiply bacterial wilt-free ginger in pots: selecting, testing, and preparing planting material; cultural practices to prevent bacterial wilt; and fertilizer considerations.

Potting Mix, Fertilizer, and Irrigation

Potting Mix, Fertilizer, and Irrigation 13 April 2020

Potting Mix, Fertilizer, and Irrigation

The right combo will boost your container garden

Vegetables grow year-round in Hawai‘i, but sunshine and good weather aren’t enough to guarantee success. What happens under the ground, where the roots are developing, is critical to the success of your garden. In this article, we’ll cover how to “feed your food” with the right growing mediums, nutrients, and hydration.

Need Seeds?

Need Seeds? 10 April 2020

Need Seeds?

The UH Seed Laboratory can help jump-start your home garden

It’s not easy to find locally developed seeds that will grow into robust plants and perform well in Hawai‘i’s unique tropical conditions. Or vegetables that are resistant to local pests and plant diseases. Fortunately for professional growers and backyard enthusiasts, the UH Seed Laboratory has just the answer.

Keep Farm Animals Fed

Keep Farm Animals Fed 10 April 2020

Keep Farm Animals Fed

Survey will support Maui County farmers

Maui County is working on a grant to support farms with farm (not domestic) animals, to make sure they have the feed they need in case there’s an interruption in the supply chain, loss of revenue, etc. The grant application needs data regarding farmers’ monthly needs. Please forward this information to stakeholders and partners who may be in need of assistance.

Container Gardening in Small Spaces

Container Gardening in Small Spaces 9 April 2020

Container Gardening in Small Spaces

Don’t have a pot for planting? Buckets, plastic jars, and carryout food containers work, too!

With more than half-a-million housing units packed into our tiny state, containerized vegetable gardening is ideal for small spaces: apartments, condominiums, patios, as well as areas with poor soil conditions. With sufficient growing space, soil drainage and aeration, sunlight, adequate nutrients, and irrigation, you can grow vegetables quickly—right at home.

4-H: Focus on Health

4-H: Focus on Health 9 April 2020

4-H: Focus on Health

Club participants give back to the community by making masks

Community support from volunteer club leaders and engaged parents is key to the survival of our Hawai‘i 4-H program. In return, during the COVID-19 pandemic, East Hawai‘i 4-H members from the Super Stars 4-H Club and Hawai‘i Island 4-H Shooting Sports Club are making the best of shelter-in-place orders by sewing face masks for community members who need them.

Feeding Moloka‘i

Feeding Moloka‘i 9 April 2020

Feeding Moloka‘i

Extension agent helps keep the Friendly Isle fed now and into the future

Cooperative Extension is pursuing a variety of ways to help communities and stakeholders hit hard by the pandemic. On Moloka‘i, food security is paramount. The largest grocery story on the island is under a 14-day quarantine, and students who depended on free or reduced-price school lunches are struggling. But Extension agent Glenn Teves is hard at work on short- and long-term solutions.

Pigs and Papaya

Pigs and Papaya 8 April 2020

Pigs and Papaya

CTAHR Extension is helping two industries save each other

The pig farmers had no feed for their pigs. The papaya farmers had no market for their papayas. But CTAHR brought them together. Extension livestock agent Mike DuPonte, a member of the Hawaii Island Pork Association, is coordinating with Hawaii Papaya Industry Association president Eric Weinert to feed surplus papayas to the pigs.

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25 July 2018

Extension Excellence

Extension Excellence

The college’s Extension agents recently got some well-deserved props in a laudatory article that first appeared in Hawai‘i Farm and Food and then was reprinted in Hawai‘i Magazine. The article focuses on three agents: Andrea Kawabata, Glen Fukumoto (pictured), and Jari Sugano, interviewing them about how they got into agriculture in the first place, what projects they’re presently working on, and what they see as the greatest challenges and rewards of their profession. Not surprisingly, some of the challenges they mention have to do with lack of funding, aging infrastructure at the research and experiment stations, and the sheer amount of work that’s needed to fulfill their mission. On the other hand, they also describe how rewarding it is to provide help, support, and science-based advice to local farmers and producers and to see the possibilities for increased sustainability and agricultural growth and diversification. They talk about the amazing farming community and the relationships they have forged with them. The picture that emerges from the story is of skilled, dedicated, and enthusiastic Extension workers who are making a huge difference in Island agriculture—one farm visit, variety trial, or workshop at a time.