CTAHR NEWS
The Business of Cover Crops 12 June 2020

The Business of Cover Crops

An essential sustainable farming practice needs more land for seeds

Cover crops, usually grown between the harvest and planting season of the main cash crop, are increasingly popular on America’s farms. From 2012 to 2017, their usage jumped by 50 percent to 6.2 million hectares. The main reason is sustainability. Cover crops make soil healthier. They reduce erosion and help restore nutrients and carbon, and create the conditions where soil can better hold moisture.

Promising Alzheimer’s Research 5 June 2020

Promising Alzheimer’s Research

Join the MBBE Zoom seminar TODAY at 10:00 a.m.

Find out more about Alzheimer’s disease at a Zoom seminar sponsored by the Department of Molecular Bioscience and Bioengineering today! Dr. Can (Martin) Zhang will present “Therapeutic Development for Alzheimer’s Disease,” on Friday, June 5, at 10 a.m. via Zoom.

Nutrition Outreach 3 June 2020

Nutrition Outreach

Professor honored for obesity prevention locally and internationally

Congratulations to Jinan Banna, who has been distinguished by the American Society for Nutrition with a Nutrition Education and Behavioral Sciences Research Interest Section Mid-Career Award. This highly competitive award is presented to a mid-career investigator who demonstrates outstanding research and contributions to the field of nutrition education and/or behavior change.

“Closing the Poop Loop” 1 June 2020

“Closing the Poop Loop”

Can human waste composting improve the environment and public health?

A new study by agro-ecologists Gavin McNicol and Rebecca Ryals shows how off-site composting of human waste is a full-cycle sanitation solution that increases safety, sustainability, even jobs. It also reduces greenhouse gas emissions and waste-borne illnesses—all while producing an effective fertilizer for agriculture.

More ‘Ulu in Our Future? 27 May 2020

More ‘Ulu in Our Future?

Climate change may expand breadfruit’s growing range

For centuries, breadfruit has served as a major staple food in the Pacific Islands, and starting 200 years ago has spread widely across the global tropics. Lauded as a crop that could potentially transform tropical agriculture and address global hunger, breadfruit has high productivity, an excellent nutritional profile, and is a long-lived tree—whereas virtually all other world staples are annual crops.

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