CTAHR NEWS
Owl Right! 19 June 2020

Owl Right!

On June 30, NREM grad student will discuss endemic, endangered pueo

You may have been lucky enough to see a pueo swooping by at dusk, when these endangered endemic owls like to hunt. But their numbers are declining, and not enough is known about them to help their recovery. Laura Luther, M.S. candidate in Natural Resources and Environmental Management, defends her master’s thesis, “Factors Influencing the Distribution of the Hawaiian Short-eared Owl (Pueo).” 

Taking Home a Bronze 15 June 2020

Taking Home a Bronze

Voice of the Sea episode about CTAHR wins a Telly Award

The Hawai’i Sea Grant center was awarded a Bronze Telly Award for educational institution programming for its episode on some CTAHR programs and faculty. This episode of Voice of the Sea explores traditional farming practices, indigenous plants, and chemicals in the aquatic environment and their effects on food fishes.

Runoff and Hawaiʻi Coral 10 June 2020

Runoff and Hawaiʻi Coral

Master’s thesis investigates the human impact on native soft octocoral

How are humans impacting the amazing corals in the ocean with runoff and other stressors? Find out at Anita Tsang’s defense of her master’s thesis proposal, “Using an endemic Hawaiian soft coral, Sarcothelia edmondsoni, as a bioindicator of freshwater input and anthropogenic influence.”

“Closing the Poop Loop” 1 June 2020

“Closing the Poop Loop”

Can human waste composting improve the environment and public health?

A new study by agro-ecologists Gavin McNicol and Rebecca Ryals shows how off-site composting of human waste is a full-cycle sanitation solution that increases safety, sustainability, even jobs. It also reduces greenhouse gas emissions and waste-borne illnesses—all while producing an effective fertilizer for agriculture.

More ‘Ulu in Our Future? 27 May 2020

More ‘Ulu in Our Future?

Climate change may expand breadfruit’s growing range

For centuries, breadfruit has served as a major staple food in the Pacific Islands, and starting 200 years ago has spread widely across the global tropics. Lauded as a crop that could potentially transform tropical agriculture and address global hunger, breadfruit has high productivity, an excellent nutritional profile, and is a long-lived tree—whereas virtually all other world staples are annual crops.

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