CTAHR NEWS
11/13/2020 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

A. Nakachi PhD Proposal Defense November 13, 20, 2:00 PM

Title: Spatially representing social values in West Hawaiʻi

Date/Time: 2:00 pm (HST) Friday November 13

Abstract:
Cultural ecosystem services (CES) consist of the non-material ‘services’ humans receive from nature. The concept of CES is being taken up by researchers and managers to include nature’s contribution to human well-being into practices and management processes. However, research evaluating CES tends to leave out ʻintangible’ and difficult to articulate values. In addition, current knowledge on CES is often not presented or known in a way that is useful for managers and decision-makers. The objective of this dissertation is to refine current methods of defining and eliciting CES to accurately represent local human values and community priorities in a way that is both beneficial to communities and useful to managers. Managers often plan and operate spatially, as such, I will explore spatially sensitive methods as a method to communicate CES in a way that is useful to managers. This dissertation will follow 4 steps to achieve the overall objective. 1) I will develop a framework to qualitatively represent the significance and emotional depth of CES through an indigenous lens and assess its applicability by conducting workshops and focus groups. 2) I will conduct a content analysis on existing mapping approaches to determine how well the various methods are inclusive of various worldviews, more ʻintangible’ values, and values with deeper emotional connections. 3) Based on the results of the content analysis, I will use or refine method(s) to conduct a pilot study to spatially represent or map values and community priorities of West Hawaiʻi. 4) I will use the lessons learned from the previous steps to further refine methods used and/or broaden out the pilot study. The results will contribute to management in West Hawaiʻi by providing a needed source of information on human well-being in relation to coastal marine ecosystems. In addition, this research will provide methodology that can be used to gain further insight on human well-being. Having such information on well-being, if included in decision making and management processes, can lead to improved management of local ecosystems.

Committee:
Kirsten Oleson (advisor)
Kirsten Leong
Leah Bremer
Mehana Vaughan
Tamara Ticktin

Zoom link:
Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86738314937?pwd=N0I5OEtyb0ZiNXRYdmhid0NRMnJHZz09

Meeting ID: 867 3831 4937

Passcode: 9X8pW6
 
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